• Worm eggs can remain under fingernails or on unwashed or improperly washed hands and can pass on from there to your baby's toys or directly into his/her mouth. 
  • Threadworms can live for up to three weeks in bed sheets or clothing. 
  • Kids share their toys at creche or school, and often can spread it to each other quite easily. 
  • The most common way they can get infected is through infected soil - if an infected person goes to the toilet in the soil, they deposit worm eggs, which then grow into larvae (immature worms). The larvae then mature. Children can get infected with hookworm from walking barefoot or crawling on infected soil, as these larvae can penetrate the skin of the feet. Other worms get into the body when someone gets soil in their hands or under the nails and then puts their dirty hands in their mouth
  • Some types of worms breed in water bodies. They can be found in lakes, dams and puddles. Playing, bathing and swimming in these areas, or drinking and eating food contaminated by the water, can cause a worm infection. 
  • It can also happen through undercooked or infected food – the worm eggs stay on plants and vegetables that have been grown in soil that is contaminated with faeces and have not been thoroughly washed. We can get infected by eating these vegetables.  
  • Animals that live along water areas, such as fish, cattle, sheep and goats can also be sick with worm infections such as tapeworms. So, meat and fish that are raw, or not well cooked, can carry worms.  
  • If someone your baby is in contact with has worms, they can pass the infection on to your baby if they do not have proper hygiene.
  • Children tend to be affected the most as their immune systems are weaker than those of adults.